Publications

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND: The bacterial communities of the nasopharynx play an important role in upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Our study represents the first survey of the nasopharynx during a known, controlled viral challenge. We aimed to gain a better understanding of the composition and dynamics of the nasopharyngeal microbiome during viral infection. METHODS: Rhinovirus illnesses were induced by self-inoculation using the finger to nose or eye natural transmission route in ten otherwise healthy young adults. Nasal lavage fluid samples (NLF) samples were collected at specific time points before, during, and following experimental rhinovirus inoculation. Bacterial DNA from each sample (N = 97 from 10 subjects) was subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing by amplifying the V1-V2 hypervariable region followed by sequencing using the 454-FLX platform. RESULTS: This survey of the nasopharyngeal microbiota revealed a highly complex microbial ecosystem. Taxonomic composition varied widely between subjects and between time points of the same subject. We also observed significantly higher diversity in not infected individuals compared to infected individuals. Two genera - Neisseria and Propionibacterium - differed significantly between infected and not infected individuals. Certain phyla, including Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were detected in all samples. CONCLUSIONS: Our results reveal the complex and diverse nature of the nasopharyngeal microbiota in both healthy and viral-challenged adults. Although some phyla were common to all samples, differences in levels of diversity and selected phyla were detected between infected and uninfected participants. Deeper, species-level metagenomic sequencing in a larger sample is warranted.

Authors: E. K. Allen, Firstname Lastname, J. O. Hendley, S. D. Turner, B. Winther, M. M. Sale

Date Published: 25th Jun 2014

Journal: Microbiome

Abstract (Expand)

The use of computational modeling to describe and analyze biological systems is at the heart of systems biology. Model structures, simulation descriptions and numerical results can be encoded in structured formats, but there is an increasing need to provide an additional semantic layer. Semantic information adds meaning to components of structured descriptions to help identify and interpret them unambiguously. Ontologies are one of the tools frequently used for this purpose. We describe here three ontologies created specifically to address the needs of the systems biology community. The Systems Biology Ontology (SBO) provides semantic information about the model components. The Kinetic Simulation Algorithm Ontology (KiSAO) supplies information about existing algorithms available for the simulation of systems biology models, their characterization and interrelationships. The Terminology for the Description of Dynamics (TEDDY) categorizes dynamical features of the simulation results and general systems behavior. The provision of semantic information extends a model's longevity and facilitates its reuse. It provides useful insight into the biology of modeled processes, and may be used to make informed decisions on subsequent simulation experiments.

Authors: Mélanie Courtot, Nick Juty, Christian Knüpfer, Dagmar Waltemath, Anna Zhukova, Andreas Dräger, Michel Dumontier, Andrew Finney, Martin Golebiewski, Janna Hastings, Stefan Hoops, Sarah Keating, Douglas B Kell, Samuel Kerrien, James Lawson, Allyson Lister, James Lu, Rainer Machne, Pedro Mendes, Matthew Pocock, Nicolas Rodriguez, Alice Villeger, Darren J Wilkinson, Sarala Wimalaratne, Camille Laibe, Michael Hucka, Nicolas Le Novère

Date Published: 27th Oct 2011

Journal: Mol. Syst. Biol.

Abstract (Expand)

This paper examines whether the in vivo behavior of yeast glycolysis can be understood in terms of the in vitro kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes. In nongrowing, anaerobic, compressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae the values of the kinetic parameters of most glycolytic enzymes were determined. For the other enzymes appropriate literature values were collected. By inserting these values into a kinetic model for glycolysis, fluxes and metabolites were calculated. Under the same conditions fluxes and metabolite levels were measured. In our first model, branch reactions were ignored. This model failed to reach the stable steady state that was observed in the experimental flux measurements. Introduction of branches towards trehalose, glycogen, glycerol and succinate did allow such a steady state. The predictions of this branched model were compared with the empirical behavior. Half of the enzymes matched their predicted flux in vivo within a factor of 2. For the other enzymes it was calculated what deviation between in vivo and in vitro kinetic characteristics could explain the discrepancy between in vitro rate and in vivo flux.

Authors: Firstname Lastname, J Passarge, C A Reijenga, E Esgalhado, C C van der Weijden, M Schepper, M C Walsh, B M Bakker, K van Dam, H V Westerhoff, Jacky Snoep

Date Published: 22nd Aug 2000

Journal: Eur. J. Biochem.

Abstract (Expand)

15 untrained women were subjected to a walking treadmill test to determine the influence of maximal exercise upon synthesis of erythrocyte 2,3 DPG. Although there was a 9.8% increase in the 2,3 DPG content following exercise, there was a concomitant 9.4% increase in the hemoglobin level; therefore, when 2,3 DPG is expressed as a ratio to hemoglobin (See Article), there was no significant change as a result of exercise stress. It was suggested that three additive factors produced during strenuous exercise; decreased pH; increased hemoglobin concentration; and increased CO2 production result in by-product inhibition of 2,3 DPG synthesis. It is concluded that 2,3 DPG does not provide a physiologic benefit in the adaptation of the oxygen transport system to exercise.

Authors: H W Bonner, C A Tate, C K Buffington

Date Published: 5th Dec 1975

Journal: Eur J Appl Physiol Occup Physiol

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