Publications

Abstract (Expand)

SUMMARY: Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) is the leading exchange format for mathematical models in Systems Biology. Semantic annotations link model elements with external knowledge via unique database identifiers and ontology terms, enabling software to check and process models by their biochemical meaning. Such information is essential for model merging, one of the key steps towards the construction of large kinetic models. SemanticSBML is a tool that helps users to check and edit MIRIAM annotations and SBO terms in SBML models. Using a large collection of biochemical names and database identifiers, it supports modellers in finding the right annotations and in merging existing models. Initially, an element matching is derived from the MIRIAM annotations and conflicting element attributes are categorized and highlighted. Conflicts can then be resolved automatically or manually, allowing the user to control the merging process in detail. AVAILABILITY: SemanticSBML comes as a free software written in Python and released under the GPL 3. A Debian package, a source package for other Linux distributions, a Windows installer and an online version of semanticSBML with limited functionality are available at http://www.semanticsbml.org. A preinstalled version can be found on the Linux live DVD SB.OS, available at http://www.sbos.eu. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

Authors: Firstname Lastname, Jannis Uhlendorf, Timo Lubitz, Marvin Schulz, Edda Klipp, Wolfram Liebermeister

Date Published: 17th Nov 2009

Journal: Bioinformatics

Abstract (Expand)

It is increasingly common to combine Microarray and Quantitative Trait Loci data to aid the search for candidate genes responsible for phenotypic variation. Workflows provide a means of systematically processing these large datasets and also represent a framework for the re-use and the explicit declaration of experimental methods. In this article, we highlight the issues facing the manual analysis of microarray and QTL data for the discovery of candidate genes underlying complex phenotypes. We show how automated approaches provide a systematic means to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations. This methodology was applied to a use case of resistance to African trypanosomiasis in the mouse. Pathways represented in the results identified Daxx as one of the candidate genes within the Tir1 QTL region. Subsequent re-sequencing in Daxx identified a deletion of an amino acid, identified in susceptible mouse strains, in the Daxx-p53 protein-binding region. This supports recent experimental evidence that apoptosis could be playing a role in the trypanosomiasis resistance phenotype. Workflows developed in this investigation, including a guide to loading and executing them with example data, are available at http://workflows.mygrid.org.uk/repository/myGrid/PaulFisher/.

Authors: Paul Fisher, Cornelia Hedeler, Katy Wolstencroft, Helen Hulme, Harry Noyes, Stephen Kemp, Robert Stevens, Andrew Brass

Date Published: 20th Aug 2007

Journal: Nucleic Acids Res.

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