Publications

13 Publications visible to you, out of a total of 13

Abstract (Expand)

3D-body scanning anthropometry is a suitable method for characterization of physiological development of children and adolescents, and for understanding onset and progression of disorders like overweight and obesity. Here we present a novel body typing approach to describe and to interpret longitudinal 3D-body scanning data of more than 800 children and adolescents measured in up to four follow-ups in intervals of 1 year, referring to an age range between 6 and 18 years. We analyzed transitions between body types assigned to lower-, normal- and overweight participants upon development of children and adolescents. We found a virtually parallel development of the body types with only a few transitions between them. Body types of children and adolescents tend to conserve their weight category. 3D body scanning anthropometry in combination with body typing constitutes a novel option to investigate onset and progression of obesity in children.

Authors: H. Loeffler-Wirth, M. Vogel, T. Kirsten, F. Glock, T. Poulain, A. Korner, M. Loeffler, W. Kiess, H. Binder

Date Published: 14th Sep 2018

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

BACKGROUND: The bacterial communities of the nasopharynx play an important role in upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Our study represents the first survey of the nasopharynx during a known, controlled viral challenge. We aimed to gain a better understanding of the composition and dynamics of the nasopharyngeal microbiome during viral infection. METHODS: Rhinovirus illnesses were induced by self-inoculation using the finger to nose or eye natural transmission route in ten otherwise healthy young adults. Nasal lavage fluid samples (NLF) samples were collected at specific time points before, during, and following experimental rhinovirus inoculation. Bacterial DNA from each sample (N = 97 from 10 subjects) was subjected to 16S rRNA sequencing by amplifying the V1-V2 hypervariable region followed by sequencing using the 454-FLX platform. RESULTS: This survey of the nasopharyngeal microbiota revealed a highly complex microbial ecosystem. Taxonomic composition varied widely between subjects and between time points of the same subject. We also observed significantly higher diversity in not infected individuals compared to infected individuals. Two genera - Neisseria and Propionibacterium - differed significantly between infected and not infected individuals. Certain phyla, including Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria, were detected in all samples. CONCLUSIONS: Our results reveal the complex and diverse nature of the nasopharyngeal microbiota in both healthy and viral-challenged adults. Although some phyla were common to all samples, differences in levels of diversity and selected phyla were detected between infected and uninfected participants. Deeper, species-level metagenomic sequencing in a larger sample is warranted.

Authors: E. K. Allen, Firstname Lastname, J. O. Hendley, S. D. Turner, B. Winther, M. M. Sale

Date Published: 25th Jun 2014

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract

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Authors: Saminda Abeyruwan, Uma D Vempati, Hande Küçük-McGinty, Ubbo Visser, Amar Koleti, Ahsan Mir, Kunie Sakurai, Caty Chung, Joshua A Bittker, Paul A Clemons, Steve Brudz, Anosha Siripala, Arturo J Morales, Martin Romacker, David Twomey, Svetlana Bureeva, Vance Lemmon, Stephan C Schürer

Date Published: 2014

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

The African annual fish Nothobranchius furzeri has over recent years been established as a model species for ageing-related studies. This is mainly based on its exceptionally short lifespan and the presence of typical characteristics of vertebrate ageing. To substantiate its role as an alternative vertebrate ageing model, a transcript catalogue is needed, which can serve e.g. as basis for identifying ageing-related genes.

Authors: Andreas Petzold, Kathrin Reichwald, Marco Groth, Stefan Taudien, Nils Hartmann, Steffen Priebe, Dmitry Shagin, Christoph Englert, Matthias Platzer

Date Published: 16th Mar 2013

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

The use of computational modeling to describe and analyze biological systems is at the heart of systems biology. Model structures, simulation descriptions and numerical results can be encoded in structured formats, but there is an increasing need to provide an additional semantic layer. Semantic information adds meaning to components of structured descriptions to help identify and interpret them unambiguously. Ontologies are one of the tools frequently used for this purpose. We describe here three ontologies created specifically to address the needs of the systems biology community. The Systems Biology Ontology (SBO) provides semantic information about the model components. The Kinetic Simulation Algorithm Ontology (KiSAO) supplies information about existing algorithms available for the simulation of systems biology models, their characterization and interrelationships. The Terminology for the Description of Dynamics (TEDDY) categorizes dynamical features of the simulation results and general systems behavior. The provision of semantic information extends a model's longevity and facilitates its reuse. It provides useful insight into the biology of modeled processes, and may be used to make informed decisions on subsequent simulation experiments.

Authors: Mélanie Courtot, Nick Juty, Christian Knüpfer, Dagmar Waltemath, Anna Zhukova, Andreas Dräger, Michel Dumontier, Andrew Finney, Martin Golebiewski, Janna Hastings, Stefan Hoops, Sarah Keating, Douglas B Kell, Samuel Kerrien, James Lawson, Allyson Lister, James Lu, Rainer Machne, Pedro Mendes, Matthew Pocock, Nicolas Rodriguez, Alice Villeger, Darren J Wilkinson, Sarala Wimalaratne, Camille Laibe, Michael Hucka, Nicolas Le Novère

Date Published: 27th Oct 2011

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract

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Authors: Vladimir B Teif, Karsten Rippe

Date Published: 1st Aug 2011

Publication Type: Not specified

Abstract (Expand)

The torrent of data emerging from the application of new technologies to functional genomics and systems biology can no longer be contained within the traditional modes of data sharing and publication with the consequence that data is being deposited in, distributed across and disseminated through an increasing number of databases. The resulting fragmentation poses serious problems for the model organism community which increasingly rely on data mining and computational approaches that require gathering of data from a range of sources. In the light of these problems, the European Commission has funded a coordination action, CASIMIR (coordination and sustainability of international mouse informatics resources), with a remit to assess the technical and social aspects of database interoperability that currently prevent the full realization of the potential of data integration in mouse functional genomics. In this article, we assess the current problems with interoperability, with particular reference to mouse functional genomics, and critically review the technologies that can be deployed to overcome them. We describe a typical use-case where an investigator wishes to gather data on variation, genomic context and metabolic pathway involvement for genes discovered in a genome-wide screen. We go on to develop an automated approach involving an in silico experimental workflow tool, Taverna, using web services, BioMart and MOLGENIS technologies for data retrieval. Finally, we focus on the current impediments to adopting such an approach in a wider context, and strategies to overcome them.

Authors: Damian Smedley, Morris A Swertz, Firstname Lastname, Glenn Proctor, Michael Zouberakis, Jonathan Bard, John M Hancock, Paul Schofield

Date Published: 30th Dec 2008

Publication Type: Not specified

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